Sociology (66)

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    Prof. Dash studies the tribals’ absorption into Hindu society and their upward movement in the jati hierarchy in medieval Orissa at the micro level. The author discusses the history of the Jagannatha cult by considering the folk tradition.

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    Hindus and Tribals by: Gaganendra Nath Dash 250.00 225.00

    The complex process of tribal absorption into the Hindu society and the mobility of jatis in the varna scale has been keenly studied by scholars in the past under various labels — ‘Sanskritization’, ‘Brahmanization’ and so on; however, there has resulted a tediousness owing to use of the same old trends and methods of research. Hindu and Tribals is a trend-setter in this regard as it studies the workings of this process from fresh perspectives using new methodologies — of inter-disciplinary approach, for instance. Prof. G.N. Dash, a learned scholar in the field, studies the tribals’ absorption into the Hindu society and their upward movement in the jati hierarchy in medieval Orissa at the micro level. The author sheds some new light on the history of the Jagannatha cult by considering folk versions of this tradition. The salient feature of the work is its freshness in approach: its focus is on interaction of the socio-economic, religious and cultural forces and counter-forces unlike traditional historical works which primarily record the political events. Adopting a new methodology, it uses the concepts and tools of social sciences like ethnology to analyse historical data. Setting new trends in Orissan historiography, it emphasises the traditional account as a source material and seeks to discover the historical background of its evolution rather than its historical basis as such. Prof. G.N. Dash emerges with important statements that scholars and historiographers cannot afford to ignore: for instance, the strong possibility of tribal origin of the Sudha Suaras and Daitas (temple servants at Jagannatha shrine). With an extensive bibliography and index, this work is invaluable for further studies in Orissan historiography. Its well-researched statements and originality in approach would provide researchers fresh material and methods for study and extend young scholars the necessary motivation to adopt new methodological trends in research.

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    This book, a collection of six lectures Dr Kapila Vatsyayan made at different UNESCO seminars and two reports, presents, discusses, analyses and prognosticates the varied aspects of human development from the perspective of a developing country.

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    Human Development in Indian Perspective and Other Essays by: Kapila Vatsyayan 595.00 536.00

    This book, a collection of six lectures Dr Kapila Vatsyayan made at different UNESCO seminars and two reports she prepared for UNESCO, presents, discusses, analyses and prognosticates the varied aspects of human development in India and other developing nations. She has made some commendable observations and suggestions with a futuristic view on UNDP’s “Human Development Report 1990” which defines and measures human development.
    Through these papers and reports, Dr Vatsyayan has attempted to chart out a new perspective as far as development is concerned from the viewpoint of developing countries. The Western paradigms in defining development do not fit the frame of these countries. Culture, arts, oral wisdom, all should come to play a crucial role in defining, planning and executing developmental programmes in such countries, and in defining their educational status.
    In addition, the volume provides a historical glimpse of Delhi and addresses the issues of cultural heritage and cultural lifestyle of the National Capital Territory of Delhi. In a nutshell, Dr Vatsyayan makes the readers travel with her continuous UNESCO engagement, over a period of sixty years.

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    Whether the discourse on Human Rights constitutes an authentically universal discourse, or merely Western discourse masquerading as such, is an issue which has persisted ever since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in 1948, and shows no signs of letting up. This book presents an in-depth exploration of this issue in a novel format, by presenting a celebrated piece on this issue by Raimundo Panikkar, with a detailed response to it by Arvind Sharma, thereby laying bare several key dimensions of the debate which may otherwise escape notice.

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    Human Rights as a Western Concept by: Raimundo Panikkar, Arvind Sharma, 120.00 108.00

    Whether the discourse on Human Rights constitutes an authentically universal discourse, or merely Western discourse masquerading as such, is an issue which has persisted ever since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in 1948, and shows no signs of letting up. This book presents an in-depth exploration of this issue in a novel format, by presenting a celebrated piece on this issue by Raimundo Panikkar, with a detailed response to it by Arvind Sharma, thereby laying bare several key dimensions of the debate which may otherwise escape notice.

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    This book covers the theory of diaspora, the historical development of the Indian communities in Australia since the late 19th century to the present times, current practices and statistical profiles of Hindus and Sikhs in Australia, and interactions between Hindus and Sikhs with the wider Australian community.

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    Indian Diaspora: Hindus and Sikhs in Australia by: Purushottama Bilimoria, Jayant Bhalchandra Bapat, Philip Hughes, 1,500.00 1,350.00

    Since the late 1990s, the Indian community in Australia has grown faster than any other immigrant community. The Indian Diaspora has made substantial contributions to the multi-ethnic and multi-religious diversity within Australia. The growth of Hinduism and Sikhism through gurus, temples, yoga and rituals of many kind has brought new colours, images, customs and practices to the profile of Australian religion, and the Australian landscape more widely. At the same time, Hinduism and Sikhism have themselves been transformed as Hindus and Sikhs from different parts of India as well as Fiji, Malaysia and other parts of the world have come together to establish a pan-Indian ethos. Hindus and Sikhs here have also interacted with other sectors of the Australian population and with religions from the Western world. This is the theme of this book.
    The Indian Diaspora covers the theory of diaspora, the historical development of the Indian communities in Australia since the late 19th century to the present times, current practices and statistical profiles of Hindus and Sikhs in Australia, and interactions between Hindus and Sikhs with the wider Australian community. There are case-studies of the Indian students and women in the Australian community, of Indian communities in Melbourne and South Australia, and of temple building and the Sikh gurdwara.
    The book has been edited by and contains contributions from Purushottama Bilimoria, an internationally-known scholar of philosophy and religion, Jayant Bhalchandra Bapat, one of Australia’s most senior Hindu priests and a scholar of Hinduism, and Philip Hughes, a leading analyst of the religious profiles of the Australian people. It also contains contributions from several other prominent scholars. Included are special essays on the importance of diaspora by the late Ninian Smart and on the 19th century Afghan cameleers and Indian hawkers.

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    The book examines the joint family system in India — its roots in Vedic times, its evolution and relevance and practicality in the present times, the changing social norms, value systems and human behaviour over time, the position and status of the aged with the decline of the system, etc.

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    Indian Family System by: Bal Ram Singh 700.00 630.00

    The joint family system has ancient roots in India, being traceable to the Vedic times when four generations lived together. The tradition helped in maintaining strong bonds of kinship and keeping alive customs and traditions of the past. This book seeks to examine the joint family system in India: its evolution and relevance and practicality in the present times. It deals with the changing social norms, value systems and human behaviour over time and views the role of religion in promoting human values and fellowship which are an essential ingredient of joint family norms. With case studies, it explores aspects of the Indian family like its cultural and ritualistic traditions, the importance and role of the woman as the backbone of the Vedic society, the position and status of the aged with the decline of the joint family system, and the importance of the joint family as a vehicle for accumulating wealth — both material and in terms of serving and benefiting all. The volume will prove a useful contribution for scholars and students in the field of Indian social and cultural studies.

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    Indian Movements by: Subhash Chandra Malik 1,300.00 1,170.00

    Does Indian civilization have the capacity to change or has it been static? The impression of this civilization as an unchanging one has been revised today. Conflict-tension processes in a complex heterogeneous civilization like that of India are equally important and require in-depth studies along with investigating the continuity of tradition. It is in this context that protest, dissent and reform movements have also played a critical role and facilitated adjustments to changing social realities over the centuries. From time to time alternate systems to the accepted ideological or normative patterns have been suggested. Apparently many of these movements were religious in nature, but the socio-economic context which remains in the background does require further detailed examination. The present volume reflects some aspects of these movements. It is one in the series undertaken as part of the group project A Sourcebook of Indian and Asian Civilizations at the Indian Institute of Advanced Study. The essays in this volume by such scholars as Arun Bali, Savitri Chandra, Narendra Mohan, M.G.S. Narayanan and Veluthat Kesavan; Y.M. Pathan, M.S.A. Rao, Sachchidananda, G.B. Sardar and Pushpa Suri will stimulate discussion and generate new perspectives towards understanding Indian civilization.

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    It is a socio-cultural study of the contemporary Indian society in the context of the invasion of the ‘culture of technology’. Analysing the reactions of Gandhi, Aurobindo, etc., it offers a futuristic assessment of the problem.

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    Indian Thought Between Tradition and the Culture of Technology by: David L. Johnson 160.00 144.00

    The book is a brilliant socio-cultural study of the contemporary Indian society in the context of the invasion of the “culture of technology”. The recent spate of technological advancements involves much more than the mere use of lifeless mechines. It is an inculcation of a constellation of values and ideas — a new culture. In a tradition-bound society like India the “culture of technology” is looked at with panic and suspicion. The phenomenon of dehumanisation and the erosion of human values associated with this culture seems to confuse the Indian mind. Yet, India has not been able to withhold the march of this culture. Dr. Johnson makes a penetrating analysis of the Indian predicament with reference to the reactions of Gandhi, Sri Aurobindo and Jayaprakash Narayan; and offers a futuristic assessment of the problem. He argues that the solution lies not in dismissing the “culture of technology” but in incorporating it within the fabric of tradition, so that India can keep pace with the time. He tackles the problem by delving deep into the intracies of the matter of tradition and technology; and spells out the changes required in our traditional way of looking at things. The book is very contemporary in its approach and reflects a rare kind of optimism about India’s potentialities in facing the problem.

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    The book deals with the critical issues and challenges of rural India and suggests ways and means to bring it into the nation building. With traditional wisdom, it mixes innovative solutions for better rural life. It can entice rural investors and be a good reference for students and teachers of economics and sociology.

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    India’s Rural Transformation and Development by: Thomas G. Fraser 500.00 450.00

    This book, a collection of updated articles presented in an international conference on India’s ‘Rural Transformation and Development: Issues, Processes and Direction’ organized by the Cordia Group of Institutes and Sanghol community on 17-18 November 2011, talks about the criticality of different issues and challenges that the rural India faces and suggests ways and means to bring it into the nation-building exercise.
    No country steadfastly grows without tapping its rural potential. Over 750 million people live in the Indian villages and there is a desperate need for them to get empowered in education and skills, and with state-of-the-art infrastructure, financial support and guidance, better agricultural methods, energy/gas generation technologies, communication network, and by introducing and training on village and eco tourism. All stake holders — the Government, NGOs, banks and self help groups — have to play a pivotal role in ensuring sustainable rural development without losing the charm and the quintessential look of the villages. The visionary Inaugural Lecture by Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, former President of India, is igniting and the icing on the cake.
    The articles are authoritative, and few case studies, add value to the content. Concepts like Community Radio are of great interest. This book will help people who want to do investment in rural areas, students of economics and sociology, those in rural researches, and for those who have an “urban heart”.

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    The volume highlights the relevance of indigenous knowledge of South Asian tribal and rural communities in sustainable management of forests and local resources. With case studies, it shows that collective initiatives at the grassroots level and locally accepted patterns of livelihood of these communities can help address challenges of economic development vis-a-vis environmental hazard and a declining resource base.

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    Indigenous Knowledge, Forest Management and Forest Policy in South Asia by: Klaus Seeland, Franz Schmithusen, 750.00 675.00

    Reflecting the latest findings of a large research project that began about a decade ago this volume, the 5th in the ongoing “Man and Forest” series, highlights the relevance of ‘indigenous knowledge’ of various South Asian tribal and rural communities in the sustainable management of forests and local resources – more specially against the growing challenges of economic development vis-a-vis environmental hazards and a declining resource base. Not only the volume reiterates the relevance of indigenous knowledge as a development tool in this age of standardized, modern know-how applications, but also illustrates its enormous impact on the social development in tribal and rural areas. Not just in India but in the adjacent countries of Nepal and Bhutan as well are analysed forest policy issues. In these countries, particularly in the current scenario of regulation, the authors emphasise of both collective initiatives at the grassroots level and securing the locally accepted patterns of livelihood for the tribal and village communities. The volume includes widely varied case studies on the role of indigenous knowledge in forestry, community living, and joint management of local natural resources. This book consists of 17 papers, based on cross-cultural, interdisciplinary investigations of well-known scholars of forest management, ethno-botanists, social anthropologists and of the members of several local NGOs involved in either community forestry or village development programmes.

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    Questioning modern methods of development, this volume discusses from the complex issues of ‘cultural identity’ to the worldwide human problems stemming from the development-planners’ unmindfulness of endogenous cultures.

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    Integration of Endogenous Cultural Dimension into Development by: Baidyanath Saraswati 560.00 504.00

    From the post-World War II decolonization to about mid-1980s, mainstream development thinking has focussed on ‘economics’, on the one-dimensional abstraction of homo economicus, to the exclusion of all else: specially the socio-cultural context in which development might take place. This divorce of ‘development’ from ‘culture’, however, was “poor economics” — a hard fact, which the international community has come to discover gradually.’ experientially. The United Nations too was not found wanting in its shared concern for culture. On 21 January 1988, it launched — under the aegis of Unesco — ”The World Decade for Cultural Development” in its effort to chiefly (a) strengthen awareness of cultural dimension of development, and (b) enrich cultural identities the world over. In the Indian capital, the Indira Gandhi National Centrel for the Arts (IGNCA) has initiated a multidisciplinary discourse on development issues vis-a-vis the whole range of cultural variables and definitions. Which its newly-introduced series: Culture and Development proposes to cover in entirety. Integration of Endogenous Cultural Dimension into Development — Volume 2 of the “Culture-and -Development” series — takes the discourse on: from the complex issues of ‘cultural identity’ to the worldwide human problems stemming from the development-planners’ unmindfulness of endogenous cultures. Carrying 17 presentations of a Unesco-sponsored workshop : 19-23 April 1995 at IGNCA, New Delhi, it questions the modern methods of development which, evolved from the experience of the industrialized world, have brought about neither peace nor harmony, neither alleviation of poverty nor socio-economic equality .Thus arguing why current development processes call for serious rethinking, the authors spell out not only the urgency of integrating endogenous cultural dimension into the paradigms of development, but also the relevance of linking development with the ethical basis of life and living. Also included in the volume are several case studies, with special reference to the Asian situation. The contributors to this volume are reputed scholars, planners and grassroots-level social workers from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.

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    This volume highlights the basic distinctions between anthropocentric and cosmocentric approaches to cultural identity and development. It discusses what constitutes culture and development and focuses on evolving viable, alternative development paradigms.

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    Interface of Cultural Identity and Development by: Baidyanath Saraswati 600.00 540.00

    From the post-World War II decolonization to about mid-1980s, mainstream development thinking has focussed on ‘economics’, on the one-dimensional abstraction of homo economicus, to the exclusion of all else: specially the socio-cultural context in which development might take place. This divorce of ‘development’ from ‘culture’, however, was “poor economics” — a hard fact, which the international community has come to discover gradually, experientially. The United Nations too was not found wanting in its shared concern for culture. On 21 January 1988, it launched — under the aegis of Unesco — “The World Decade for Cultural Development” in its effort to chiefly (a) strengthen awareness of cultural dimension of development, and (b) enrich cultural identities the world over. In the Indian capital, the Indira Gandhi National Centrel for the Arts (IGNCA) has initiated a multidisciplinary discourse on development issues vis-a-vis the whole range of cultural variables and definitions. Which its newly-introduced series : Culture and Development proposes to cover in entirety. This inaugural volume, thematically focussing on “Interface of Cultural Identity and Development”, comprises 23 presentations of a Unesco-sponsored meeting of experts: 19-23 April 1993 at IGNCA, New Delhi. Highlighting the basic distinctions that exist between anthropocentric and cosmocentric approaches to the question of cultural identity and development, the authors reflect on what constitutes culture and development not per se, but as an integral holistic notion of culture and lifestyle, culture and development, culture and region, culture and linguistic/ecological identities, and how some of the viable alternative development paradigms could be evolved from the convergence of mystical ancient insights and modern science. Authored by eminent anthropologists, sociologists, scientists and other area-specialists from Australia, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Iran, Mongolia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Turkey, the papers here not only consider diverse theoretical issues of cultural identity and development, but also set out case studies in different field situations.

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    Jyotiba Phule, a multi-faceted social reformer of the nineteenth century, relentlessly worked for the uplift of the oppressed classes, having started schools for girls and children of the lower castes and farmers, widow homes and orphanages. His philosophy of universal religion strengthened him to fight against child marriage, sati and casteism, and for the remarriage of Brahmin widows.

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    Jyotiba Phule by: Archana Malik-Goure 170.00 153.00

    Caste conflicts ruled the roost in the nineteenth-century India. It housed many social evils like untouchability, discrimination against women and the underprivileged, and sati. Education was the prerogative of the mighty Brahmins and the upper-class society, resulting in the perennial exploitation of the backward classes, women, farmers and widows.
    Jyotiba Phule (1827–90) dawned as the saviour of the weaker sections. Defying diktats and intimidations, he got himself and his wife educated. This paved the way for the Phule couples to start and successfully run few schools for the children of the downtrodden and girls. He opened his well for the untouchables’ use. Through tireless efforts and continued writings, he fought against the social injustices, nail and tooth. His writings were a new philosophy in the making — a philosophy of universal religion. He believed in God, but refused to believe the Vedas, saying them as the handworks of Brahmins.
    Man was his religion and his emancipation was his drive. He founded Widow Homes and orphanages. For him education was the key for liberation from all social evils. He fought with the English regime to have the children of farmers and the downtrodden equal rights to education. He was eventually accredited with the title ßMahatmaû.
    This book is sure to generate keen interest among social workers, modern historians, researchers on social reforms and reformers, and students of sociology and political science.

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