Art & Architecture (129)

Showing 121–132 of 135 results

Sort by:
  • Sale!
    img-book

    This volume on the burial silks, excavated from the sand dunes of Central Asia, offers a window to the history of a lost civilization revealing how the complex thread of interconnections linking East and West helped to shape new civilizations along the way.

    Quick View
    The Silk Road Fabrics by: ArputhaRani Sengupta 4,000.00 3,600.00

    During the Roman Empire when pure silk was valued like gold, burials in Han China and Central Asia were furnished with luxurious fabrics. Application of Western motifs and designs in the newly developed Chinese silk technology led to the emergence of a unique patterned silk.Silk fabrics connecting the Mediterranean with inmost Asia allowed transmission of knowledge across the world of ideas and beliefs. Archaeology in the Age of Discovery unearthed the exceptional Silk Road Fabrics from graves and shrines spanning several centuries and across the vast continental expanse of Central Asia, Egypt, Europe, China, and Japan. To Sir Aurel Stein (1856–1935) and others the various types of textiles excavated from the sand dunes of Central Asia were worth the risks. The burial silks offer a window to the history of a lost civilization revealing how the complex thread of interconnections linking East and West helped to shape new civilizations along the way.

  • Sale!
    img-book
    Quick View
    The Splendour of Srivilliputtur by: Chithra Madhavan 1,200.00 1,080.00
    The bustling town of Srivilliputtur is well known for its Vishnu temple dedicated to Vatapatrashayee and the adjacent temple for Andal and Rangamannar. The Vatapatrashayee temple is one of the famous Divya Desams or sacred places eulogized in the Tamil verses (pasurams) of the Alwars (twelve important devotees of Vishnu). The deity in this temple has received the encomiums of Perialwar and Andal who belonged to this place. The first chapter of this book details the traditional story (Sthala Puranam) of Srivilliputtur, while the next is about the two famous Alwars connected with this sacred place- Perialwar and Andal, with special reference to the literary works of Andal, namely the Thiruppavai and Nachiyar Thirumoli. There is a chapter on the Amuktamalyada, a well-known literary work in Telugu by Emperor Krishnadeva Raya of the 16th century C.E. The chapter on the architecture and sculptures of the Vatapatrashayee and Andal-Rangamannar temples gives the general layout of the two temples situated adjacent to each other and details about the various sanctums, images of deities enshrined therein, sculptures and paintings. Andal’s parrot (kili) is famous, especially in the Srivilliputtur temple. Its symbolism, importance, material of which it is made and various other details are the content of a chapter focusing on the parrot. Around Srivilliputtur are some small shrines which are connected with the main temples in this town. These find mention in a separate chapter.
  • Sale!
    img-book

    The Netra Tantra “Tantra of the (Third) Eye (of Siva)”, also called Mrtyujit (Conqueror of Death), is one of the fundamental scriptures of non-dualist Kashmir Saivism or Trika. It is the only Tantra having the Third Eye of Siva as title and theme, and it contains three important chapters on Yoga, relating to three ways of overcoming death.
    This book, besides giving an introduction to the Tantra, contains an interpretation of the three chapters; Chapter 1 deals with the Eye of Siva, Chapter 7 with subtle Yoga, and Chapter 8 with supreme Yoga. The same texts are presented in Devanagari, transliteration and translation, including the eleventh-century commentary of Ksemaraja, illustrious disciple of Abhinavagupta. The Appendix contains illustrations of the theme of trinetra from different sources, mainly connected with Kashmir, as well as a comparative study on “The spiritual eye in the Christian mystical traditions”.
    This book is an important contribution to the studies on non-dualist Saivism or Trika, and especially to its Yoga.

    Quick View
    The Yoga of Netra Tantra by: Bettina Sharada Bäumer, Shivam Srivastava (Editor), 1,700.00 1,530.00

    The Netra Tantra “Tantra of the (Third) Eye (of Siva)”, also called Mrtyujit (Conqueror of Death), is one of the fundamental scriptures of non-dualist Kashmir Saivism or Trika. It is the only Tantra having the Third Eye of Siva as title and theme, and it contains three important chapters on Yoga, relating to three ways of overcoming death.
    This book, besides giving an introduction to the Tantra, contains an interpretation of the three chapters; Chapter 1 deals with the Eye of Siva, Chapter 7 with subtle Yoga, and Chapter 8 with supreme Yoga. The same texts are presented in Devanagari, transliteration and translation, including the eleventh-century commentary of Ksemaraja, illustrious disciple of Abhinavagupta. The Appendix contains illustrations of the theme of trinetra from different sources, mainly connected with Kashmir, as well as a comparative study on “The spiritual eye in the Christian mystical traditions”.
    This book is an important contribution to the studies on non-dualist Saivism or Trika, and especially to its Yoga.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    The book studies the 360 icons of the Chu Fo P’u-sa Sheng Hsiang Tsan pantheon — referring to a rare set of woodcuts distinct among Buddhist pantheons. It analyses the unique features of this pantheon, pointing out the significance of each figure in the mythological/theological framework and minutely describing the iconography of the images.

    Quick View
    Tibetan Iconography of Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and Other Deities by: Lokesh Chandra, Fredrick W. Bunce, 5,600.00 5,040.00

    Beginning with a few aniconic symbols, like footprints, the Bo tree or stupas, in the pre-christian Indian art, Buddhism, over the centuries, came to evolve a be-wildering array of deities — in ever-increasing number of pantheons. Interestingly, in Buddhism today, there are perhaps as many pantheons as there are countries, or internal regions or sects within them. Chou Fo P’u-sa sheng Hsiang Tsan, in focus here, is one of these many Buddhist pantheons and acknowledgedly the ‘culmination of Lamaist art’. Authored by Rol. pahi.rdo.rje, alias Lalitavajra, (1717-1786): an imperial preceptor of Emperor Ch’ien-lung (1736-1795), it is a rare set of 360 wood-cuts/xylographs, representing varying forms and manifestations of the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, tantric and tutelary deities, arhats, sages, teachers, dharmapalas and protective divinities. It is also accompanied by 360 `eulogies’ in Chinese. Two internationally distinguished scholars here team up to present afresh the Chou Fo p’u-sa Sheng Hsiang Tsan, aptly called ‘a unique pantheon’. Drawing together all the 360 wood-cut images in their vividly enlarged/enhanced versions — without compromising their aesthetic integrity, the book not only captures their subtle iconic devices, but spells out as well, in meticulous detail, all their iconic attributes, like body postures, faces, arms/hands, mudras, asanas, vahanas, companions, and whether clam or wrathful. The book also incorporates the names of each deity/deity-form in Sanskrit, Manchu, Mongolian, Tibetan, and Chinese. Unveiling, for the first time, the images of a veritably unique pantheon, in their enlarged format, and their accompanying Chinese eulogies, the book is bound to fascinate anyone concerned with Buddhist art and iconography.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    The book details the significance of the toranas — arched portals or festoons — in ancient and medieval architecture of South and South-east Asia, with special emphasis on Indian representation. The text is richly illustrated with photographs and line drawings from remote sites, museums and archival collections.

    Quick View
    Torana in Indian and Southeast Asian Architecture by: Parul Pandya Dhar 4,200.00 3,780.00

    The present work discusses in depth the subject of toraªas (arched portals or festoons) in the ancient and medieval architecture of South- and South-east Asia, with special emphasis on Indian representations. Their antiquity and rationale; their continued presence in association with stupas, caves, temples, mosques, cities, forts, and palaces; their myriad forms and transformations; and their aesthetic and symbolic relationship to the structure in question are analyzed stage-by-stage in this book. The rich corpus of toraªas included here has been critically and comparatively analyzed in relation to traditional practice, as well as in the light of the medieval architectural treatises, historical records, and other literary sources. The approach is ‘micro’ in the sense of being focused on a specific architectural element but ‘macro’ in its regional and temporal span. In addition, the exposition reveals the grammar as well as the manifold visual formulations of the toraªa as representative of the basic principles of traditional Indian architectural ornament: integral to the structure, functionally apt, aesthetically significant, and visually evocative, with sound and sophisticated design principles. The text is richly illustrated, bringing together material scattered over several well-known as well as remote sites, museums, and archival collections. Whereas a major part of this book details the journey of the toraªa in ancient and medieval India, the section on early beginnings also includes references from Pakistan and Afghanistan, and the final chapter surveys, with a view to compare, parallel yet distinct expressions in Cambodia, Thailand, Champa, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    The essays here, challenging the boundaries and assumptions of mainstream art history, question many preconceived notions about meaning in representations — artistic and art historical. Emphasizing on specific visual cultures within the dynamics of historical processes, they raise critical issues of art production, circulation and consumption and attempt to rescue traditional arts from a past that is hermetically sealed off from the present.

    Quick View
    Towards A New Art History — Studies in Indian Art by: Shivaji K Panikkar, Parul Dave Mukherji, Deeptha Achar, 4,500.00 4,050.00

    Mainstream art historical writing on Indian art has remained focused on identifying and defining stylistic schools, understanding evolutionary patterns and regional styles as well as understanding iconographic and narrative conventions and structures. The wide-ranging essays in this volume challenge the boundaries and assumptions of mainstream art history. Moving away from an art history structured by an art object-centered approach, this book gestures at a framework-oriented approach that calls attention to the political, social, economic structures that undergird art. It is an attempt to reformulate the discipline in a manner that can explain the field of the visual in a way that goes well beyond the explanatory capacity of conventional modes of studying Indian art. These essays question preconceived notions about meaning in representations — artistic and art historical. They contest earlier claims about the objectivity of scholarship in general and history writing in particular as much as they critique the valorization of a purely individuated, subjective art criticism. In its attempt to historicize the practice of art, the book examines the economic, political and social implications of art that enable the re-situation of Art History among social science disciplines. The emphasis is on the study of specific visual cultures within the dynamics of historical processes. These essays raise critical issues of art production, circulation and consumption as well as production of meaning. Traditional arts have been studied from a critical perspective that extricates them from a past that is hermetically sealed off from the present. The opposition of ‘High Art’ and ‘non-art’ (read popular or mass visual culture) has been challenged. Breaking outside the ambit of high art, studies in the book extend from popular, mass-produced art to MTV imagery to digital art.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    This book is a modest compilation of Warli art Þ of the Warli tribes of Maharashtra Þ that comes through an unbroken tradition of thousands of years. Warli art is simple yet rich. The paintings are expressive with profound truths which are brought forth in a most elementary format.

    Quick View
    Unique Art of Warli Paintings by: Sudha Satyawadi 700.00 630.00

    Warli painting has its own place in adivasi art of India. It takes its name from the Warli tribes of Maharashtra. It seems their roots are in the rock shelters of ancestors found in Bhimbhedka and Raisen in Madhya Pradesh.
    Warli paintings are pointers — they fulfil a purpose. Their presence in the hut is auspicious and is said to promote fertility, avert disease, propitiate the dead, etc. They show rituals at birth, marriage, a life full of dance and music, livelihood, connectivity with death and life after death. Artists express a kind of fulfilment they experience that is in harmony with nature and their gods and goddesses.
    Warli art is simple yet rich. The material used for painting is simple, themes contained therein, philosophy of existence and even life beyond death, all are brought forth in a most elementary format. Many specimens of Warli art are contained in this book. The paintings are expressive with profound truths and project all that one needs to know how to live a happy life. Austere brown wall surface of huts displaying tribal designs with typical rock art motifs make Warli art different from other tribal paintings of India.
    This book is a modest compilation of Warli art that comes through an unbroken tradition of thousands of years. But Warli art traditions are gradually vanishing. Money elsewhere is pulling artists away from their traditional occupation. Something has to be done by society to create conditions for them, to not get weaned away by lure of commercial avenues. This book is a small effort to save this art from falling off from the pathway of time continuum.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    The three scholarly volumes contain an iconographic analysis and compilation of the over 760 images from the six chapels of the Pao-hsiang Lou in the Forbidden City, Beijing. There are details of each image like name in Sanskrit, Tibetan and Chinese; physical description; iconographical and stylistic features; and associated images.

    Quick View
    Vajrayana Images of the Bao-Xiang Lou by: Fredrick W. Bunce 14,000.00 12,600.00

    The three volumes contain an iconographic analysis and compilation of the over 760 images from the six chapels of the Pao-hsiang Lou (Bao-xiang Lou) in the garden of the Tzu-ning Kung (Palace of Kindness and Tranquillity) in the Forbidden City, Beijing. The pavilion Pao-hsiang Lou, a two-storied simple structure with seven chapels on each floor, holds hundreds of Tibetan Buddhist images of remarkable quality. The volumes present the entire set of images, each reproduced and explained with great clarity. There are details of each image with regard to the physical description of the figure portrayed and its various iconographical and stylistic features and associated images. Each entry contains the name of the deity with the Sanskrit, Tibetan and Chinese transliterations of the name. The very interesting and useful introduction discusses deities of mandalas, placement of deities within a single chapel, images of the Pao-hsiang Lou pantheon compared to the Chu Fo P’u-sa Sheng Hsiang Tsan pantheon, variations in depiction of images with regard to their hair, crown and other parts and associated ornaments, and the asanas of the images. The scholarly volumes are a result of the painstaking research by the author by referring to noted experts on the subject. The volumes will interest all students and scholars of Buddhist art and iconography.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    This volume, through colours, transcends many a cue of the aesthetic aspects of human life into a connoisseur’s mind. Whether on fabric or canvas, mud wall or floor, sculptures or pots, colours for us is a language, a raga and a tala.

    Quick View
    Varsha by: Harsha V. Dehejia 1,495.00 1,346.00

    Colours are not just for adornment, but a medium that reflects our state of mind, artistic acumen, culture, ethics, philosophy, social values, tradition and the sacredness of life. A non-verbal language, they conjure up our emotions, feelings and moo ds, and take a rasika far beyond the realms of words. In them we see the lush and luxuriant natural world around us, the world of birds and blossoms, earth and sky, gems and stones, creating in us a certain feeling and a gush of powerful ethos.
    The artist in Varsha, through colours, transcends many a cue of the aesthetic aspects of human life into a connoisseur’s mind. Whether on fabric or canvas, mud wall or floor, sculptures or pots, colours for us is a language, a raga and a tala. And Celebration of Colours is just that.
    Involved with her family, Varsha loves art and craft, whether it is painting, embroidery, working with terracotta and ceramic, jewels and the creation of ornaments, crochet and knitting, stitching and designing clothes, or cooking. Absorbed in the world of colour, she likes to share her moment of beauty with everyone around her and spread joy everywhere.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    Examining vàstu÷àstra’s conceptual roots in øilpa÷àstra and its later evolution, the volume analyses technical aspects of vàstu÷àstra by concentrating on the essential elements (aïgas) of vàstu÷àstra which involve decision-making and actual construction methods, art of engineering and role and responsibilities of engineers, and aspects related to land materials and rituals associated with use of building after its construction

    Quick View
    Vastusastra by: Rahul V. Altekar 400.00

    Though there has been considerable interest in vastushastra in recent times and the orientational aspects of vastushastra have been often discussed, little is known of the essential elements that constitute This small book, written in a simple and lucid style, contains teachings of great men, gleanings from the scriptures, and examples from the epics and Puranas, and suggests easy solutions to the various problems faced by man in the present-day world of violence, wars, killings and disasters, and how to have a holistic approach to life vastushastra and its scientific application in the present day. Based on extensive research, the work, vastushastra attempts to address this aspect. Examining comprehensively the subject of vastushastra: its conceptual roots in Shilpashastra and its later evolution as dealt with in the Vedas, the Epic literature, Arthashastra, literature on ayurveda and Kamasutra literature, the volume analyses technical aspects of vastushastra by concentrating on the essential elements [angas] of vastushastra which involve decision-making and actual construction methods, art of engineering and role and responsibilities of engineers, and aspects related to land materials and rituals associated with use of building after its construction. It discusses the eco-friendly life style of the ancient Indians based on vastushastra principles. Giving minute attention to details, it focuses on the application of vastushastra in the present-day society — how the vastushastra principles can be scientifically applied and the potential of application of vastushastra keeping in view modern trends in architectural science and civil engineering.
    The book will be useful for students and scholars of architecture and engineering and those interested in vastushastra.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    The book gives account of the Vaishnavite temples of Kanci, providing numerous pictures with the structural, architectural and sculptural aspects of the temples. It also throws light on the historical, religious, social and cultural values of the temples.

    Quick View
    Vishnu Temples of Kanchipuram by: R. Nagaswamy 4,800.00 4,320.00

    Kancipuram was the important capital of north Tamil Nadu for a long period — from the first-second century ce to the end of the seventeenth century. It was a beautiful city laid out in the form of a lotus, according to the poem Perumbanarrupadai. It was admired by the world as a place famous for its festivals and noted for its temples. Through the ages, it has been the abode of many religious leaders who devoted their lives to the religious uplift of the people.
    This well-illustrated work presents a history of the Vaishnavite temples of Kanci, focusing on the history of the ancient temples from the Sangam Age onwards, the many legends, myths and other accounts that refer to it, and its location and building. It provides a detailed account of some major temples of the city supported by numerous pictures of the temples that cover various aspects of each — the entrance and other parts of each temple structure, its architecture, and its artistic engravings particularly its sculptural beauty. It delves into the Vaishnava tradition for concepts and ideas underlying the construction of the sanctum and the sub-shrines, and portrayal of divine forms on the walls, pillars and other parts of the temple. There is a detailed study of the sculptures in the main walls of the temples and the main deities in the shrines. It also examines the many inscriptions found in the temples to offer insights into the historical, religious, social and cultural value of the temples.
    The volume is bound to interest a host of readers, particularly scholars and students of Indology involved in the study of the cultural traditions of south India and its religious art and architecture.

  • Sale!
    img-book

    This volume examines how the perceptible form of Buddhist mandalas represents shunya (void), with special reference to the mandalas of Tabo and Alchi. On the basis of the concept of vak (subtle sound) in Trika Shaivism of Kashmir, it investigates where their aesthetic power derives from.

    Quick View
    Voice of the Void by: Sung Min Kim 3,200.00 2,880.00

    The research undertaken here about Buddhist mandalas is basically designed under the philosophical question how the visible dimensions of forms are related to their invisible contents. The textual sources in reference to Buddhist mandalas teach that the essence of mandalas is shunya (void) and their forms are the reflective images (pratibimba) of shunya. This volume investigates how the colourful form of Buddhist mandalas represents the prime concept of shunya, and what makes these mandalas visually powerful, leaving the impression of ßspiritual enhancementû in the heart of people who do not even know about the Buddhist doctrines.
    The mandalas permanently represented in the monastic complexes of Tabo and Alchi in the Western Himalayas have been focused in order to examine a prominent role of visual dimensions of mandalas. In order to comprehend mandalas in the context of Buddhist philosophy, the texts of the Yoga-Tantra class have been looked up. Especially, the references to the tantric visualization-practice throw light on the internal experiences with mandalas.
    Considering the fact that the Buddhist mandalas have been developed as a method of Mantrayana, being always combined with mantras and mudras, this volume presents the concept of vak (word, subtle sound, voice) as a key to explain how the ultimate state of shunya and perceptible forms of mandalas are related to each other. The doctrine of vak developed in the tradition of Trika Shaivism in Kashmir provides us with a systematic way to explain the non-dualism between all phenomenal objects and the Supreme Divine. The doctrine of four levels of vak is examined in the book for the purpose of interpreting the aesthetic phenomena and structuring the different levels of meanings of mandalas from the aesthetic perspective. On the basis of the vak theory, the external forms of mandalas have been explored and their visual principles have been technically analysed, in attempt to answer the question: how do the colourful forms of Buddhist mandalas resemble the formless shunya?

X