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    India and Indonesia maintained strong cultural and historical relationship for few millennia. As a testimony to it India stood firm for Indonesia’s freedom from the Dutch, inspiring its leaders. With India’s Look East Policy, the mutual relationships, especially in trade, have reached new heights. The economic reforms in both the countries demand stronger ties in the days to come.

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    India Indonesia Bilateral Ties by: Gautam Kumar Jha 800.00 720.00

    India and Indonesia experienced close historical and civilizational relations from the ancient times to sixteenth century ce. During the Indonesian freedom struggle, its leaders were inspired by the anti-colonial views of Indian leaders. India firmly stood for the freedom of Indonesia from the Dutch.
    During the post-colonial period, the bilateral relations underwent ups and downs. India’s Look East Policy of the 1990s made a phenomenal leap in both the countries’ relationship. India by leveraging its soft power, stable foreign policy, non-interference policy established trust among many South-East Asian countries and in particular Indonesia. Indonesia, being the largest country in the region, has been proved as one of the greatest allies of India.
    After a decade of stable governance under President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, Indonesia now has a fairly strong democratic set-up. The country made the transition after thirty-one years of dictatorship of Soeharto, under the leadership of B.J. Habibie, Abdurrhaman Wahid and Megawati Soekarnoputri.
    Now, when both the countries are poised to fly high after having witnessed considerable economic reforms, they need to forge stronger ties in order to further expand bilateral trade and strategic relations, being the main focus of this volume.

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    Evidences suggest that India and Indonesia were in trade relations for many millennia, starting from 3500 bce. Indonesia got all three religions — Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam — from India. There were ups and downs in their relations. This volume vividly talks about topics that foster(ed) mutual relations such as culture, religion, language, traditions and education.

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    India Indonesia Legacy of Intimate Encounters by: Gautam Kumar Jha, Son Kuswadi, 750.00 675.00

    Evidences suggest that India and Indonesia were in trade relations for many millennia, starting from 3500 bce. Suvarnabhumi (Sumatra) is mentioned in Jatakas, Indian epics and Mahavamsa, though there is no sequential documentation of it. The trade relations paved the way for Bali importing Indian pottery, priests coming from India and getting absorbed into the Indonesian society and the Indian traders and priests marrying the locals and settling there, thus spreading Hinduism and Indian culture throughout Java, Bali and Sumatra. Indonesia thus got all three religions — Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam — from India.
    The historical and civilizational relations continued till the sixteenth century ce. The Western colonization drive of Asian countries broke this long-stood relationship. Coming to the twentieth century, Indonesia and its leaders were highly inspired by the anti-colonial views of Indian leaders like Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Vallabhbhai Patel and Rabindranath Tagore, and India extended her moral support to the freedom struggle of Indonesia. But during the post-colonial era, the bilateral relations between both the countries were incoherent. The Look East Policy of India in the 1990s rejuvenated the relations and Indonesia became one of the greatest allies in fulfilling India’s South-East Asia Policy.
    The scholarly articles in this volume vividly talk about topics that foster(ed) mutual relations such as culture, religion, language, traditions, education and so on, keenly drawing the attention of policy makers, trade analysts, cultural enthusiasts, investors, among a wide range of audience.

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    The book relates the diverse experiences of Mr. Tzannis Tzannetakis, a former Greek Prime Minister, in India: he witnesses centuries-old marvels, landmarks of its long religious-cultural tradition; and his response is profound and genuine.

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    India, Another Way of Life by: Tzannis Tzannetakis 900.00 810.00

    “A journey to India . . . is quite unlike a journey to any other land . . .” — this sentiment expresses the ‘uniqueness’ of a visitor’s experience of India. For, among other things, India is a perpetual mystery to him from the beginning; he wades through the mystique and out of it; and he is never free of it. For Mr. Tzannis Tzannetakis, a former Prime Minister of Greece, India is this and much more. His informal experiences presented here are diverse and steeped in the historic-cultural flavour special to India. He sees its centuries-old palaces, forts of ancient maharajas, of the glorious Mughals; the unparalleled cave monuments of Ajanta-Ellora with their exquisite carvings, the breathtaking sculptural decorations and the architectural ‘dream’ of Khajuraho; the grandeur of the Taj, a wonder in white marble; the exotic deserts of Jaisalmer; the heart of holy India, Banaras, with the ever-flowing Ganga; the marvel of Delhi which amalgamates the old and the new. His response is, likewise, rich with a range of tones; he not only admires the material landmarks of ancient India but breathes in the ‘spirit’ of the past — the old delight, the royal romance, the dignity, valour in that chivalry . . . His is not simply a ‘discovery’ of India but an analysis of India’s ‘time-tested’ values and its ‘modern’ message in order to understand India in the real sense — its unique past; the India of today, of the traditional and the modern; and the India of the future . . . its goals, aspirations. The author’s tone is wonder-struck but, at the same time, genuine and realistic. He captures the ‘essential’ India — and not just its forms and colours — to present a delightful, critical and sensitive picture.

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    This book covers the theory of diaspora, the historical development of the Indian communities in Australia since the late 19th century to the present times, current practices and statistical profiles of Hindus and Sikhs in Australia, and interactions between Hindus and Sikhs with the wider Australian community.

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    Indian Diaspora: Hindus and Sikhs in Australia by: Purushottama Bilimoria, Jayant Bhalchandra Bapat, Philip Hughes, 1,500.00 1,350.00

    Since the late 1990s, the Indian community in Australia has grown faster than any other immigrant community. The Indian Diaspora has made substantial contributions to the multi-ethnic and multi-religious diversity within Australia. The growth of Hinduism and Sikhism through gurus, temples, yoga and rituals of many kind has brought new colours, images, customs and practices to the profile of Australian religion, and the Australian landscape more widely. At the same time, Hinduism and Sikhism have themselves been transformed as Hindus and Sikhs from different parts of India as well as Fiji, Malaysia and other parts of the world have come together to establish a pan-Indian ethos. Hindus and Sikhs here have also interacted with other sectors of the Australian population and with religions from the Western world. This is the theme of this book.
    The Indian Diaspora covers the theory of diaspora, the historical development of the Indian communities in Australia since the late 19th century to the present times, current practices and statistical profiles of Hindus and Sikhs in Australia, and interactions between Hindus and Sikhs with the wider Australian community. There are case-studies of the Indian students and women in the Australian community, of Indian communities in Melbourne and South Australia, and of temple building and the Sikh gurdwara.
    The book has been edited by and contains contributions from Purushottama Bilimoria, an internationally-known scholar of philosophy and religion, Jayant Bhalchandra Bapat, one of Australia’s most senior Hindu priests and a scholar of Hinduism, and Philip Hughes, a leading analyst of the religious profiles of the Australian people. It also contains contributions from several other prominent scholars. Included are special essays on the importance of diaspora by the late Ninian Smart and on the 19th century Afghan cameleers and Indian hawkers.

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    The book examines the joint family system in India — its roots in Vedic times, its evolution and relevance and practicality in the present times, the changing social norms, value systems and human behaviour over time, the position and status of the aged with the decline of the system, etc.

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    Indian Family System by: Bal Ram Singh 700.00 630.00

    The joint family system has ancient roots in India, being traceable to the Vedic times when four generations lived together. The tradition helped in maintaining strong bonds of kinship and keeping alive customs and traditions of the past. This book seeks to examine the joint family system in India: its evolution and relevance and practicality in the present times. It deals with the changing social norms, value systems and human behaviour over time and views the role of religion in promoting human values and fellowship which are an essential ingredient of joint family norms. With case studies, it explores aspects of the Indian family like its cultural and ritualistic traditions, the importance and role of the woman as the backbone of the Vedic society, the position and status of the aged with the decline of the joint family system, and the importance of the joint family as a vehicle for accumulating wealth — both material and in terms of serving and benefiting all. The volume will prove a useful contribution for scholars and students in the field of Indian social and cultural studies.

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    Marriage or Vivaah, particularly in India, is a sacred ceremony comprising various customs Þ religious and social Þ and Vedic rituals. These are meant to propitiate the gods for obtaining their blessings for the bride and the bridegroom, and to honour and entertain those who participate in the celebrations. This book explains in detail, all the important rituals which form part of the marriage.

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    Indian Marriage by: R.N. Kogata 1,400.00 1,260.00

    Marriage is considered a very significant ritual for giving society’s sanction to a close relationship between a man and a woman as husband and wife. It is, therefore, also called a social system. The marriage ceremony is a combination of many rituals, based on information contained in Hindu scriptures. It also represents and reflects the social customs and practices that are prevalent in the society. The rituals vary depending upon the community, the religion and the state where they are performed. The marriage customs, rites and rituals among royal families are mentioned in this book — most of these rituals are followed by common people as well and are performed in the original or altered forms in the Indian society. Mr R.N. Kogata and Mrs Lalita Kogata did a lot of research and consulted several authorities and have written in detail about the various rituals involved in a human being’s life from birth to death. Different scholars have mentioned different numbers of rituals and sacraments — 25, 40 or 48. But Maharishi Veda Vyasa has described 16 rituals as important. Out of these, the Vivaah (marriage) samskaar itself encompasses various rituals — the main ones covered in this book are: the Bindaulee (wedding procession); Hathalevaa (hand-taking ceremony or paanigrahan), Phere (agni pradakshinaa, circumambulation of fire); Kanyaadaan (giving away daughter in marriage); Maangbharaaye (filling vermilion); Mangalsutra (tying the wedding thread); Saptapadee (walking seven steps together); and Vadhu kee Vidaaee (bride’s departure to her in-law’s house). This book should be in all households in order that all will know the meanings of the various rituals in a marriage — particularly in the present days when learned pandits who can explain the rituals, are few, and people have no time or inclination to go through voluminous scriptures or texts on the subject of marriage.

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    The book deals with the critical issues and challenges of rural India and suggests ways and means to bring it into the nation building. With traditional wisdom, it mixes innovative solutions for better rural life. It can entice rural investors and be a good reference for students and teachers of economics and sociology.

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    India’s Rural Transformation and Development by: Thomas G. Fraser 500.00 450.00

    This book, a collection of updated articles presented in an international conference on India’s ‘Rural Transformation and Development: Issues, Processes and Direction’ organized by the Cordia Group of Institutes and Sanghol community on 17-18 November 2011, talks about the criticality of different issues and challenges that the rural India faces and suggests ways and means to bring it into the nation-building exercise.
    No country steadfastly grows without tapping its rural potential. Over 750 million people live in the Indian villages and there is a desperate need for them to get empowered in education and skills, and with state-of-the-art infrastructure, financial support and guidance, better agricultural methods, energy/gas generation technologies, communication network, and by introducing and training on village and eco tourism. All stake holders — the Government, NGOs, banks and self help groups — have to play a pivotal role in ensuring sustainable rural development without losing the charm and the quintessential look of the villages. The visionary Inaugural Lecture by Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, former President of India, is igniting and the icing on the cake.
    The articles are authoritative, and few case studies, add value to the content. Concepts like Community Radio are of great interest. This book will help people who want to do investment in rural areas, students of economics and sociology, those in rural researches, and for those who have an “urban heart”.

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    Questioning modern methods of development, this volume discusses from the complex issues of ‘cultural identity’ to the worldwide human problems stemming from the development-planners’ unmindfulness of endogenous cultures.

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    Integration of Endogenous Cultural Dimension into Development by: Baidyanath Saraswati 560.00 504.00

    From the post-World War II decolonization to about mid-1980s, mainstream development thinking has focussed on ‘economics’, on the one-dimensional abstraction of homo economicus, to the exclusion of all else: specially the socio-cultural context in which development might take place. This divorce of ‘development’ from ‘culture’, however, was “poor economics” — a hard fact, which the international community has come to discover gradually.’ experientially. The United Nations too was not found wanting in its shared concern for culture. On 21 January 1988, it launched — under the aegis of Unesco — ”The World Decade for Cultural Development” in its effort to chiefly (a) strengthen awareness of cultural dimension of development, and (b) enrich cultural identities the world over. In the Indian capital, the Indira Gandhi National Centrel for the Arts (IGNCA) has initiated a multidisciplinary discourse on development issues vis-a-vis the whole range of cultural variables and definitions. Which its newly-introduced series: Culture and Development proposes to cover in entirety. Integration of Endogenous Cultural Dimension into Development — Volume 2 of the “Culture-and -Development” series — takes the discourse on: from the complex issues of ‘cultural identity’ to the worldwide human problems stemming from the development-planners’ unmindfulness of endogenous cultures. Carrying 17 presentations of a Unesco-sponsored workshop : 19-23 April 1995 at IGNCA, New Delhi, it questions the modern methods of development which, evolved from the experience of the industrialized world, have brought about neither peace nor harmony, neither alleviation of poverty nor socio-economic equality .Thus arguing why current development processes call for serious rethinking, the authors spell out not only the urgency of integrating endogenous cultural dimension into the paradigms of development, but also the relevance of linking development with the ethical basis of life and living. Also included in the volume are several case studies, with special reference to the Asian situation. The contributors to this volume are reputed scholars, planners and grassroots-level social workers from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.

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    This book aims at developing an exclusive literary framework to analyse the Indian queer literary works. It helps in excavating the convoluted layers and subversive potential of queer identities, and in studying the efforts made by the Indian writers to homosexualize various so-called normative spaces.

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    LGBTQ by: Kuhu Sharma Chanana 800.00 720.00

    The invisibility accorded to queer literary works in India has a systematic sinister agenda of silencing. Such a hidden target can be countered only by cataloguing the still unexplored queer texts in various Indian languages and by developing unique critical tools to analyse these texts in a such a manner that helps in excavating the convoluted layers and subversive potential of queer identities.
    This book aims at developing an exclusive literary framework to analyse the Indian queer literary works. In all, there are seven chapters which deal with the themes of plurality of lesbian existence, ambivalent adaptation techniques adopted by the writers to grant visibility to subaltern sexualities, overlapping of class and homosexuality, the development of exclusive queer aesthetics by inversion of accepted mode of literary language, imagery and techniques, the doubly marginalized identity of lesbian diaspora and the specific rift between lesbianism, feminism and queer activism in Indian context as presented in literary studies.
    It also deals with the issues of biphobia, violence on hijra identity (perhaps one of the most marginalized identity in LGBTQ movement), the depiction of symbiotic relationship between space, sexual identity and sexual citizenship in Indian literary texts and the efforts made by the writers to homosexualize various so-called normative spaces.

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    The book Make Time for Yourself – It’s Your Time is a text written from a very personal standpoint, in the context of the author’s spiritual life as a monk. “Nothing in this world has eternal value. Use your time and don’t waste it. . . .” “Time is for most of us a luxury good.” Making time for yourself and giving time to others is a source of joy that enriches our lives. The quiet time we devote to prayer or meditation gives us strength to master our lives and enhances our spirituality.

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    Make Time for Yourself by: Notker Wolf 250.00 225.00

    The book Make Time for Yourself – It’s Your Time is a text written from a very personal standpoint, in the context of the author’s spiritual life as a monk. “Nothing in this world has eternal value. Use your time and don’t waste it. . . .” “Time is for most of us a luxury good.” Making time for yourself and giving time to others is a source of joy that enriches our lives. The quiet time we devote to prayer or meditation gives us strength to master our lives and enhances our spirituality.

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    Management and Organization of Indian Universities by: Subhash Chandra Malik 1,600.00 1,440.00

    The Indian Institute of Advanced Study organized some decades ago a seminar on management and organization of Indian universities, with the University of Mysore, in Mysore. These are being republished again because the topics are very relevant today although the knitty gritty of numbers and other data statistics has certainly changed; quantitatively this is true but qualitatively the issues remain the same despite the new educational policies and commissions. The essentials of various conflicts within the system, because of a fragmented approach, continue to disrupt the implementation of new educational ideas, policies and commissions. It is a truism to state that educational needs are imperative and their problems need to be dealt with urgently. And yet today, apart from quantitative expansion, we remain substantially where we were at the time of India’s Independence, as far as management and organization of Indian universities are concerned.
    There is an increasing need for a practical and detailed consideration of the problem of higher education in the context of its organizational framework. The problems of basic reforms which involve curricula, examinations, research quality and scope of facilities, faculty and student unrest, the problems of denominational institutions, medium of instruction, etc. are also of immediate relevance. One of the major areas in this context is the governance of Indian universities. The pattern of university administration has become obsolete and has never received the kind of specialized consideration and planning. Rules, regulations, techniques and red tape have hampered the real purpose of university education.

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    India’s association with the South-East Asian countries, especially those on either side of the Mekong River, is well known. It analyses India’s past and present relationship in the domains of architecture, religious engagements, interculturality, syncretism of cultures, interliterariness, composite literary cultures, religious arts, trade associations, among others.

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    Mekong-Ganga Axis by: Pankaj Mittal, Ravi Bhushan, Daisy, 1,200.00 1,080.00

    India has a fascinating history of cultural relationship with South-East Asia, spanning across more than the last two millennia, mainly with the spread of Buddhism and Hinduism, deeply impacting the cultural, religious and social lives of people in countries such as Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam. The Hindu-Buddhist monuments in South-East Asia stand testimony of this peaceful and mutually beneficial interaction. The contents of this book — Mekong-Ganga Axis — centre around India’s association with most of the countries of the region, especially those on either side of the Mekong River.
    Most of the South-East Asian countries were influenced by more than two foreign cultures, though they have an indigenous culture. The Chinese and Indian cultures had impacted them the most, in addition to the European influence. However, only India’s impact was peaceful and, to a great extent, non-political. This paved the way for many developments in architecture, religious engagements, interculturality, syncretism of cultures, inter-literariness, composite literary cultures, religious arts, trade relations and so on.
    This book thus critically engages one to all these topics and more, and recalls India’s glorious relationship of the forgone era with these countries, showcasing somewhat a similar kind of cultural/religious affinity from South China to India. And two great rivers, Mekong and Ganga, are witness to it. It also reinstates the criticality of India to be engaged with these countries at present because of the compulsions of a globalized world.

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