Sanskrit Studies (5)

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    Atreyashiksha holds a unique position in the corpus of the Shiksha literature. It shows that the main aim of the text is to explain the practical aspects of the different ways of Vedic recitation, in whose connection it describes the theoretical elements of Shiksha too. The phonological rules, most of which are expressed in the Taittiriya Pratishakhya, are also illustrated in this text.

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    Atreyashiksha by: Deepro Chakraborty 800.00 720.00

    Atreyashiksha is one of the Shiksha texts of the Krishna-Yajurveda, Taittiriya school. This text has been critically edited and translated consulting two palm-leaf manuscripts which are currently the only discovered manuscripts of this text in public libraries. Shiksha texts deal with phonetics and phonology of the Vedas and the method of proper pronunciation and recitation. The Atreyashiksha is well-structured in terms of arranging its topics of discussion.
    When compared to the other Shikshas of the Taittiriya school, the Atreyashiksha, in keeping its focus on the discussion on the different methods of Vedic recitation, namely, word-reading (padapatha), sequential reading (kramapatha), tangled reading (jatapatha) and the five varieties of the reading of the phonic sequences (varnakramas), holds a unique position in the corpus of the Shiksha literature. A close reading of the text shows that the main aim of the text is to explain the practical aspects of the different ways of Vedic recitation, in whose connection it describes the theoretical elements of Shiksha too.
    The book, therefore, serves as a practical guidebook to Vedic reciters who recite the above-mentioned readings of the Taittiriya Krishna-Yajurveda along with the continuous reading. While describing the methods of recitation, the Atreyashiksha gives enough emphasis on the theoretical nuances. The phonological rules, most of which are expressed in the Taittiriya Pratishakhya, are also illustrated in this text. This book consists of a detailed introduction, the critically edited text in Devanagari script, its Roman transliteration and an authentic English translation.

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    Brahma’s Universe The Chronicle of Creation by: Pandit Madhusudan Ojha 1,100.00 990.00

    Renowned Vedic scholar, Pandit Madhusudan Ojha has presented in this volume a rich and ancient history of our world and civilization.
    Jagadguruvaibhavam, the final part of the trilogy authored by Ojhaji on various facets of Creation, is as much an insightful work on the Vedic knowledge contained in the Vedas and Puranas as also an exceptional example of his profound knowledge and wisdom. Indravijayah (Bharatavarsha: The India Narrative in English) and Devasurkhyati are the first two volumes on the subject.
    The Brahma’s Universe: The Chronicle of Creation is the English translation of Jagadguruvaibhavam prepared by a board of editors at Shri Shankar Shikshayatan headed by well-known Indologist, Prof. Kapil Kapoor.
    Brahma is the central character of this book and through his forms, age and abode, Ojhaji has outlined the story of our universe’s evolution. It was Brahma who perceived that, in this world, the source of energy is the surya or sun. All spiritual, metaphysical and supraphysical energies exist in the surya. The vital energy (prana), which gives life to all beings too is produced from the sun. Brahma recorded all these in granthas (volumes) that came to be known as the Vedas.
    Written in verse form, the volume offers a unique rendering of the creation of atma, veda, praja and dharma. Ojhaji presents a remarkable insight into the ancient knowledge on rivers, mountains, eras and communities like Sadhyas and Manijas.
    Brahma’s Universe is more than a companion book of Bharatavarsha: The India Narrative. It expands the magnificent narrative of Creation, offers broader meaning to Vedic terms and illuminates the profound wisdom contained in the Vedas.

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    Meaning in Bhartrharis Vakyapadiya by: Ved Mitra Shukla 650.00 585.00

    The study of grammar and linguistic philosophy had its origin in the Vedic period, at least in the second millennium BCE. The Vakyapadiya of Bhartrhari, an authoritative Sanskrit text written in the fifth century CE, contains reflections on the subject matter of language and grammar, thus the philosophy of language. Interpretation of communication is one of the principal objectives of Bhrtrhari’s philosophy of language. His goal is to interpret the communication of all living things, be it a man or an animal, or a yogi or a baby. Bhartrhari represents a rich tradition of Indian philosophy of language that he inherited from Panini and Patatijali. The West, for all practical purposes, lagged behind in grammar, literary theories, philosophy of language and with the problems of meaning, even at the dawn of the twentieth century, when the Indian Grammarians made penetrating studies on the same even before the common era.

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    Shivajnanabodhabhashyam by: Sharath Chandra Swamy 800.00 720.00

    The experiences and knowledge from our past are recorded in manuscripts which have been handed down to us over several thousand years. The Government of India, through the Department of Culture, took note of the importance of this vast tangible heritage and, in order to preserve and conserve as well as to make access to this wealth easy, established the National Mission for Manuscripts (NMM). In order to disseminate the knowledge content of manuscripts, the Mission has taken up several programmes such as lectures, seminars, and workshops. The Mission publishes the proceedings of the above-said programmes under the following series: “Samrakshika” (on conservation), “Tattvabodha” (comprising lectures based on manuscripts delivered by eminent scholars), Samikshika” (research-oriented papers presented in the seminars), and “Kritibodha” (transcribed and edited texts prepared at advanced level manuscriptology workshops conducted by NMM).
    NMM has taken up a project for publishing rare and unpublished manuscripts in three forms: (a) facsimile, (b) critical edition with annotation, and (c) critical edition with translation. This series has been named as “Prakashika”.
    This critically edited volume of the Shivajnanabodhabhashyam is a commentary by Shivagrayogin, an acclaimed authority on Shaiva Siddhanta, on the Shivajnanabodham of Meykandadeva, another great exponent of Shaivaism. It is the most authentic, canonical and methodical work on Shaiva Siddhanta. It stands as a mark of classical scholasticism in the Indian philosophical system. It is 39 in the Prakashika Series.

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    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) is a modest tribute to those who are genuinely interested in Vedas’ universal message. It is a collection of select Vedic statements with Hindi and English translations intending to communicate the Vedic wisdom to the young people of modern age. This book, with fairly accurate translations from Vedic Sanskrit, aims to acquaint the modern readers with their most ancient, richest literary heritage so that they can comprehend its worth and bring value to their life.
    In spite of numerous translations available, this volume has some novelty in its content and freshness in its presentation, and stands witness to the fact that in representing Vedas, there still exist infinite possibilities.

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    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) by: Shashi Prabha Kumar 250.00 225.00

    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) is a modest tribute to those who are genuinely interested in Vedas’ universal message. It is a collection of select Vedic statements with Hindi and English translations intending to communicate the Vedic wisdom to the young people of modern age. This book, with fairly accurate translations from Vedic Sanskrit, aims to acquaint the modern readers with their most ancient, richest literary heritage so that they can comprehend its worth and bring value to their life.
    In spite of numerous translations available, this volume has some novelty in its content and freshness in its presentation, and stands witness to the fact that in representing Vedas, there still exist infinite possibilities.

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