Linguistic Studies (48)

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    Shivajnanabodhabhashyam by: Sharath Chandra Swamy 800.00 720.00

    The experiences and knowledge from our past are recorded in manuscripts which have been handed down to us over several thousand years. The Government of India, through the Department of Culture, took note of the importance of this vast tangible heritage and, in order to preserve and conserve as well as to make access to this wealth easy, established the National Mission for Manuscripts (NMM). In order to disseminate the knowledge content of manuscripts, the Mission has taken up several programmes such as lectures, seminars, and workshops. The Mission publishes the proceedings of the above-said programmes under the following series: “Samrakshika” (on conservation), “Tattvabodha” (comprising lectures based on manuscripts delivered by eminent scholars), Samikshika” (research-oriented papers presented in the seminars), and “Kritibodha” (transcribed and edited texts prepared at advanced level manuscriptology workshops conducted by NMM).
    NMM has taken up a project for publishing rare and unpublished manuscripts in three forms: (a) facsimile, (b) critical edition with annotation, and (c) critical edition with translation. This series has been named as “Prakashika”.
    This critically edited volume of the Shivajnanabodhabhashyam is a commentary by Shivagrayogin, an acclaimed authority on Shaiva Siddhanta, on the Shivajnanabodham of Meykandadeva, another great exponent of Shaivaism. It is the most authentic, canonical and methodical work on Shaiva Siddhanta. It stands as a mark of classical scholasticism in the Indian philosophical system. It is 39 in the Prakashika Series.

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    The volume aims at sharpening the skills of translating the Sanskrit philosophical texts so as to retain fundamental concreteness, basic dynamics and original flavour. The volume particularly highlights the use and significance of prefixes in the backdrop of leading Indian philosophical texts.

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    Significance of Prefixes in Sanskrit Philosophical Terminology by: Betty Heimann 350.00 315.00

    This volume attempts to present a dynamic approach to translating Sanskrit philosophical texts while emphasizing on keeping certain principles in mind when rendering Sanskrit philosophical texts such as: the fundamental concreteness, the basic dynamics, the resultant ambiguity and the necessary congruence of the term in question with the specific context in which it is introduced. In this context, it particularly throws light on the use and significance of prefixes, particularly of propositions used as prefixes, in Sanskrit philosophical terminology. It also examines the basic problem in dealing with prefixes; their relation to the verbal roots to which they are attached. It studies the philosophical texts of various leading schools and systems including Vedanta, Mimamsa, Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Buddhism and Jainism, to examine the compound-terms in them and the mental operations which are grammatically and philosophically expressed. Study of the variation of terms brought about by the application of prefixes is intended. It argues that the prefixes throw into relief, by the different modes of their application, the specific bent of the systems themselves. They have retained the motional and emotional significance, which they apparently once had, at the earliest stage. The book also takes up some vital questions, such as, whether the prefix or the noun is the essential bearer of the meaning.
    The volume is a well-researched study of the use of language in Sanskrit philosophical texts. It will prove useful to scholars and students of Indology, particularly those concerned with Sanskrit language and philosophy.

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    The individual papers published in this compendium present a comprehensive view of the status and trends of Sanskrit studies in India and related developments over the last sixty years. This state-wise systematic presentation covers various aspects of Sanskrit teaching, research and publications as also the diverse initiatives taken by the state governments, etc. for promotion of Sanskrit Studies in the recent past.

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    Sixty Years of Sanskrit Studies (1950–2010), Vol. 1: India by: Radhavallabh Tripathi 750.00 675.00

    Sanskrit was born and nurtured in India and in course of time became the mother of many languages worldwide besides a host of regional languages, it continues to be a source of inspiration, treasure trove of knowledge and a symbol of universal brotherhood. These virtues of the great language need to be taken good care of.
    There is hardly any region or district in India where Sanskrit is not studied in some form or the other. This volume 1 of Sixty Years of Sanskrit Studies presents a comprehensive view of the status and trends of Sanskrit studies in India (volume II takes up the scenario of Sanskrit studies in some other countries of the world). It is a compilation of expert papers that survey the state of Sanskrit studies in the different states/union territories of the country in a systematic manner.
    The individual papers begin with an analysis of the position of the Sanskrit language in the states of India. They cover various aspects of teaching, spread of popularity, research and publications in Sanskrit language and literature. They also deal with the Sanskrit academies established by the state governments and discuss the Indological research journals being brought out by various academies and institutes as also journals in the Sanskrit language. Scholars herein explore attempts made at investigating the inter-relationship of Sanskrit with medieval literatures in other languages or the regional literatures. They particularly focus on grammar, epic literature, Sanskrit religious and secular literature besides the manuscripts of other kinds. They also examine the evolution of great centres of Vedic studies in India, such as Pune, and attempts made to rediscover the corpus of the lost sàkhàs and later Vedic texts.
    This volume will immensely interest students and scholars of Sanskrit studies and Indology who are keen to know about the present status of the Sanskrit language and literature in India.

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    While covering the status of Sanskrit studies in 13 countries across the world and bringing forth the challenges the ancient language faces, the articles by the leading international scholars contained in the book urge for understanding the future of Sanskrit studies in the larger context of human culture and as a cementing force in bringing together diverse cultures and civilizations.

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    Sixty Years of Sanskrit Studies (1950–2010), Vol. 2 by: Radhavallabh Tripathi 600.00 540.00

    With the popularity of Orientalism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, knowledge of Sanskrit in the Western world led to the emergence of new schools and disciplines for study like, comparative mythology, comparative religion and comparative linguistics, etc. The articles presented in this volume examine the state of Sanskrit studies in universities in different countries of the world (volume 1 presents a survey of Sanskrit studies in universities and institutes in the states/union territories of India).
    Covering some 13 countries, the articles herein discuss how some departments, related to the study of religions, in countries like the US have incorporated Sanskrit even as some other universities as those in the UK, US and other parts of the world, have Sanskrit as one of the subjects under other departments. They emphasise the fact that it is not possible to view Sanskrit as an autonomous discipline, providing authenticity to various other branches of learning, but that it has to be considered as a part of the larger framework of the global studies. They point to the emergence of new schools and centres for studies of Sanskrit in various countries. At the same time, they also examine the alarming situation arising because of the erosion or marginalisation of Sanskrit across the world, especially as some Sanskrit departments in reputed universities or institutions of higher learning, are being closed one after the other. They urge for understanding the future of Sanskrit studies in the larger context of human culture while underlining the importance of Sanskrit as a cementing force in bringing together diverse civilisations and cultures.

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    The book makes it explicit on how certain important philosophical questions generated from logic are, in the ultimate analysis, rooted in the area of philosophy of language. It also suggests certain means of settling these issues of philosophy of logic.

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    Some Philosophical Issues in Logic & Language by: Sadhan Chakraborti 600.00 540.00

    Philosophy of logic and philosophy of language are closely interrelated areas of research. Many of the philosophical questions arising from logic cannot be fully addressed without taking into consideration certain issues associated with the concerned language. The philosophical issues, e.g. concerning validity of an argument, proof for the validity of an argument are philosophical problems, which are generated from the study of logic.
    The book makes it explicit on how certain important philosophical questions generated from logic are, in the ultimate analysis, rooted in the area of philosophy of language. It also suggests certain means of settling these issues of philosophy of logic. In addition to certain issues in philosophy of logic the book extensively deals with certain issues in philosophy of language such as the issue concerning holism, semantic inferentialism, realism, objectivity of statements and representationalism.
    Those who are engaged in advanced research in philosophy of language and philosophy of logic will benefit immensely from reading this book. It will also be of great use to the students of philosophy and to the general readers as well.

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    The Dictionary containing more than eleven thousand words including honorific words, is a practical handbook that attempts to provide a quick yet thorough understanding of the colloquial Tibetan language. It presents Tibetan words in romanised form for pronunciation by those who do not understand Tibetan.

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    Students English-Tibetan Colloquial Dictionary by: C.A. Bell 380.00

    The Dictionary is a practical handbook that attempts to provide a quick yet thorough understanding of the colloquial Tibetan language. A special feature of the Dictionary containing more than eleven thousand words including honorific words, is that the Tibetan words are presented in romanised form for pronunciation by those who do not understand Tibetan. An introductory chapter details the structure and system of pronunciation of Tibetan letters and words. It combines an easy approach with incorporation of features like two or more Tibetan words against the same English equivalent and the literary form in the Tibetan character, with the colloquial form in the romanised Tibetan, when the colloquial and Tibetan forms differ from each other to some extent. All this is to aid in a deeper knowledge of the subject. A special feature of this edition is that all the corrections listed in the errata of the second edition have been carried out in the main text. The volume will be particularly useful to scholars of Tibetan language and English-speaking students learning the language.

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    This book addresses issues in Sanskrit grammar, principally Paninian grammar, works of Paniniyas, including Patanjali’s Mahabhasya, Bhartrhari’s Vakyapadiya, etc. It also covers the Sanskrit grammar of Paulinus a Sancto Bartholomaeo, and includes a study examining whether formal hand gestures in Indian dance could come within the range of vyakarana.

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    Studies in Sanskrit Grammars by: George Cardona, Ashok Aklujkar, Hideyo Ogawa, 995.00 896.00

    The importance of ancient and medieval contributions in India to the field of vyakarana and thereby to our knowledge of grammar and the history of linguistics is universally accepted. This volume presents sixteen contributions to this field of study which were presented at the fourteenth World Sanskrit Conference held in Kyoto, Japan, September 1st-5th 2009. The papers cover a wide range of subjects, both chronologically and thematically. Most of the studies concern aspects of Paninian grammar, with respect to both Panini’s grammar proper and to works of Paniniyas, including Patanjali’s Mahabhasya, Bhartrhari’s Vakyapadiya and the Kasikavrtti of Jayaditya and Vamana. There are also contributions that range farther afield, covering the Sanskrit grammar of Paulinus a Sancto Bartholomaeo, Paninian features to be seen in the Lilatilakam of fourteenth century Kerala, and a study considering whether formal hand gestures used in Indian dance can possibly come within the range of what is called vyakarana. This collection should be of interest not only to Sanskritists but also more generally to students of Indian culture and linguists.

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    The core of this book is devoted to the karaka theory as it is taught in the Bhattikavya. In the introductory section, an outline of this kavya and a summary of the author’s findings in his previous work on it are given.

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    The Karaka Theory Embodited in Rama’s Story by: Yoto Kawamura 650.00 585.00

    There has been a steady flow of scholarship dealing with the karaka theory as expounded in various grammatical works. The purpose of the present book is to conduct a searching examination into a text which has received little attention from Paninian scholars and whose voice has remained unfamiliar, the Bhattikavya. One can see from Bhatti’s illustrations of the karaka rules how he interprets them, and also how he interweaves the illustrations with the Rama story in his poetic work, which is intended as a textbook on Sanskrit grammar. In the introductory section, an outline of the Bhattikavya and a summary of the author’s findings in his previous work written in Japanese on this kavya (2017, Kyoto: Hozokan) are given. The present volume also includes two appendices that take up related questions concerning poetic composition and Vedic usage.

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    The book is the end result of indepth study and decades’ research on the Oriental and Occidental language theories. The theories that are propounded and expounded by Indian sages and intelligentsia are impeccable, incorrigible and time-tested besides being universal. The book should interest scholars for advanced linguistic study of both kinds.

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    Theories of Language by: Korada Subrahmanyam 650.00 585.00

    The volume presents a panorama of the theories of language, covering both ancient and modern theories. It deals with the origin and development of ancient theories of language with their clear and unambiguous definitions, rules and norms that offer impeccable solutions to all problems at syntactic and semantic levels. With systematic and logical explanations of language theories, the work examines ancient grammar including connection of vyakaranam with philosophy and sphota. It also takes up the origin and development of Western linguistic theories emphasising on the inability of modern linguistic science to agree on basic definitions, as of the meaning of a word, and concepts of discourse, text, macro sentence, with there being an attempt to constantly revise theories. It analyses the chief concepts studied by ancient Indian and other linguists pertaining to discourse, particularly the importance of inference in the Nyaya system of Indian philosophy and the Nyaya logical discourse. The volume will provide students and scholars of philosophy a fundamental work on linguistic theories.

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    The book deals with the main contribution of Bhartrhari to the field of linguistic study and its impact on philosophy in general. Presenting a systematic study of the jati, dravya and bhuvodravya samuddeshas in the Vakyapadiya it also looks at the concept of jati in the philosophies of Nyaya and Mimamsa.

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    Vakyapadiya by: Dr. Sharda Narayanan 700.00 630.00

    This research study is concerned with understanding the concept of jati and dravya in the Vakyapadiya of Bhartrhari.
    The concept of jati is crucial to the enunciation of sphota, the single most outstanding contribution of Vakyapadiya to the field of language study. The concept, already connected with the import of a word in Nyaya-Vaisheshika and Mimamsa schools, was brought into the field of linguistics by Bhartrhari. This book traces the development of language study from the Vedic period to the darshanas. It deals with the main contribution of Bhartrhari to the field of linguistic study and its impact on philosophy in general. It then presents a systematic study of the jati, dravya and bhuyo dravya samuddeshas in the Vakyapadiya, explaining all the karikas. It also views the concept of jati in the philosophies of Nyaya and Mimamsa, its development over the centuries and the necessity of modifying some tenets owing to the sharp criticism from other schools especially Buddhism. The volume includes relevant quotations from Sanskrit texts and makes use of important commentaries like the Prakasha of Helaraja and Ambakartri of Pt. Raghunatha Sarma.
    The scholarly work will prove invaluable to scholars and students of Indology, particularly those keen on studying Indian linguistic philosophy with special reference to Bhartrhari.

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    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) is a modest tribute to those who are genuinely interested in Vedas’ universal message. It is a collection of select Vedic statements with Hindi and English translations intending to communicate the Vedic wisdom to the young people of modern age. This book, with fairly accurate translations from Vedic Sanskrit, aims to acquaint the modern readers with their most ancient, richest literary heritage so that they can comprehend its worth and bring value to their life.
    In spite of numerous translations available, this volume has some novelty in its content and freshness in its presentation, and stands witness to the fact that in representing Vedas, there still exist infinite possibilities.

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    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) by: Shashi Prabha Kumar 250.00 225.00

    Vedamritabindavah (Drops of Vedic Nectar) is a modest tribute to those who are genuinely interested in Vedas’ universal message. It is a collection of select Vedic statements with Hindi and English translations intending to communicate the Vedic wisdom to the young people of modern age. This book, with fairly accurate translations from Vedic Sanskrit, aims to acquaint the modern readers with their most ancient, richest literary heritage so that they can comprehend its worth and bring value to their life.
    In spite of numerous translations available, this volume has some novelty in its content and freshness in its presentation, and stands witness to the fact that in representing Vedas, there still exist infinite possibilities.

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    This book, typed afresh, presents a phonetic survey of Vedic sounds, offering explanatory accounts of Vedic sandhi-system, declension, conjugation, indeclinable words, nominal stem formation and syntax. It is the first ever most authentic, linguistic material of the Rgveda.

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    Vedic Grammar for Students by: Arthur A. Macdonell 225.00

    Here is a key to unlock the oldest treasury of mankind’s wisdom: Vedic literature — not just the metrical language of its hymns, but also the prose pieces of the Brahmanas/Brah-mana-like writings: whether from the Atharva or the Yujurveda. Setting forth a comprehensive phonetic survey of Vedic sounds, the author: an eminent Orientalist of yester years, offers lucid explanatory accounts of Vedic sandhi-system (euphonic combination), declension, conjugation, indeclinable words, nominal stem formation and, finally, of its syntax — with numerous illustrations. At the base of Macdonell’s Grammar is the first ever, yet the most authentic, linguistic material of the Rigveda — supplemented, though, it is from other Samhitas as well. Also marked here are the grammatical forms of the Brahmanas where they differ from those of the later-day classical Sanskrit. Now ‘reprinted’ afresh in an innovative format, this book has sustained its decades-long worldwide importance as an undisputed, systematically organised aid to the study of Vedic literature. And, for sure, retains its indispensablity to scholars even today!

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