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Bharat Gupt

Nationality: Indian

Gender: male

Date Of Brith: 28/11/1946

Academic & Professional Qualifications:

Bachelor B.A. (Hons.) in English University of Delhi 1967
Master M.A. in English University of Delhi 1969
  M.A. in English University of Toronto 1971
Ph.D Ph.D. in English M.S. University of Baroda 1991

 

Position(s) Held:

1 Associate Professor of English Literature, College of Vocational Studies, University of Delhi 1987 Till date
2 Visiting Professor, National School of Drama 1988 Till date
3 Lecturer, University Grants Commission, University of Poona 1988 1993
4 Assistant Professor of English, College of Vocational Studies 1973 1987
5 Assistant Professor in English, Hindu College, University of Delhi 1972 1973

 

Membership(s) of Societies/Association:

Member of the Jury for the International Onasis Prize for Drama (1995)

About the Author

Bharat Gupt, Reader (Associate Professor) in English, College of Vocational Studies, University of Delhi, holds two Master’s degrees, one from St. Stephen’s College, Delhi and another from Toronto. He did this doctoral research at the M.S. University of Baroda. He was taught sitar and surbahar by Pandit Uma Shankar Mishra and musicology and classics by Acarya Brhaspati. Trained both in modern and traditional educational systems, he is also on the Visiting Faculty of National School of Drama, Delhi. For his interest in media studies he was awarded a Fellowship to work at the McLuhan Program, University of Toronto. Author of several research articles, he has presented many papers at various international seminars.

Details of Books/Monographs

1 Dramatic Concepts Greek and India D.K. Printworld 1994
2 Natyashastra Brahaspati Publications 1996
3 India: A Cultural Decline or Revival? D.K. Printworld 2008

 

Details of Articles

1. “The Technique of Allusion in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot”, in Student’s Handbook in American Literature. Ed. C.D. Narsimhaiah, Ludhiana Kalyani, 1972, pp. 188-97.
2. “Laxmi Narain Lal Ka Abdulla Dewaana (in Hindi)”, in Natak Aur Rang Manch, ed. I, Madan, Delhi: Lipi Prakashan, 1975, pp. 95-100.
3. “Ravishena krita Padma Purana main Sangit Carca (in Hindi)”, in Sangeet, Hatharasa Karyalaya, May 1981, pp. 15-16.
4. “Sangit ko Acharya Brihaspati ki den (in Hindi)”, in Sangeet, 6 articles, July-December, 1981.
5. “Origin of Dhruvapada”, in Sangeet Nataka, Journal of Sangeet Natak Academy, New Delhi.
6. “Music in the Natyasastra”, in Journal of the Music Academy, Madras 56 (1985), 165-75; 57 (1986), 172-81; 58 (1987), 91-109; 59 (1988) 57-82; 60 (1989).
7. “Valmiki’s Ramayana and the Natyasastra”, in Sangeet Natak, 81-82 (July-Dec. 1986) 63-76.
8. “The Date of Natyasastra”, Journal of the Original Institute of Baroda 36, 1-4 (Sept. 86-June 87) 69-86.
9. “Use of the Dhruva Songs in Ancient Indian Theatre”, Journal of the Oriental Institute of Baroda 37 (March-June 1988) 305-20.
10. “Classifications on Lokadharmi and Natyadharmi”, Sangeet Natak 95, (Jan.-March 1990) 35-44.
11. “Peace as Theatrical Experience”, in Manascarya, Journal of Cultural Studies, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Vol. II, No. 2&3, 1996, pp. 64-9.
12. “What is Ethnic”, The Eastern Anthropologist, 50:2, 1997, pp. 139-46.
13. “Religious Plurality in Education”, Globalization and Identity, Editors, Majid Tehraninan and B. Jeannie Lum, transaction Publishers, UK/USA, 2006, pp. 55-62.
14. “Laughter and Tears in Classical Indian Theatre: Its Theoretical Frame”, Dioniso, Indtituto Nazionale del Dramma Antico. DIONYSOS 2007, No. 6, Journal of National Institute of Ancient Drama, Italy, pp. 338-41.
15. “Classical Indian Art Theory and its Present Day Worth”, Shruti, Delhi, Vol. 2, April 2008, pp. 58-71.
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Dramatic Concepts Greek and Indian
Rs.890.00

This study offers a fresh approach in comparing ancient Greek and Indian dramatic theories. Instead of treating the Poetics and the Natyashastra as Western and Eastern viewpoints, it places them within the broad framework of ancient Indo-European culture and the art of sacred drama (hieropraxis). It demonstrates that hieropraxis was basically different from post-Renaissance European drama which was entirely secular in content and Realistic in presentation. The Poetics and the Natyashastra on the contrary, belonged to theatres which pleased both gods and men, and which used semiotised gesture, dance, music, and dialogue to create a highly ornate theatrical reality. The book aims at comparing not only the concepts as propounded by Aristotle and Bharata Muni, but also attempts to reconstruct the Greek and Indian performances to highlight their similarities and differences. In view of the increasing constrains imposed on artistic endeavours by commercial pre-occupations in today's world, this stimulating revaluation of the two major classical stage-crafts will go a long way in the discerning and shaping of newer modes of performance. Concepts like anukarana, dharmi, abhinaya, itivritta, mimesis, muthos, melopoiia, katharsis and rasa, etc., as revisited and expounded here, can be seen as means of creating dramatic shows which go beyond message and entertainment to provide sublimer experiences.

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India
Rs.500.00

It is often taken for granted that Independence from the British rule also ushered an era of cultural and social freedom in India. The author wishes to examine if that is true or if a cultural decline set in soon after.

Based on a verse in the Pancatantra, the book has been divided into six parts: Eka (person), Kula (family), Grama (habitat), Janapada (land), Prithvi (earth) and Atma. Issues of education; conflicts between the classes, regions, jatis, languages and religions; expansion of proselytizers; lack of governance; tensions between the legislators and judiciary; rise of unbridled consumerism; falling standards of democracy; dilemmas created by notions of dharma challenged by Westernized modernity; and the problems of attaining universal harmony, are all put into a perspective under these six categories. While examining the state of affairs the author also suggests a way for the pursuit of happiness through unselfish transcendence.

 

...
India
Rs.300.00

It is often taken for granted that Independence from the British rule also ushered an era of cultural and social freedom in India. The author wishes to examine if that is true or if a cultural decline set in soon after.

Based on a verse in the Pancatantra, the book has been divided into six parts: Eka (person), Kula (family), Grama (habitat), Janapada (land), Prithvi (earth) and Atma. Issues of education; conflicts between the classes, regions, jatis, languages and religions; expansion of proselytizers; lack of governance; tensions between the legislators and judiciary; rise of unbridled consumerism; falling standards of democracy; dilemmas created by notions of dharma challenged by Westernized modernity; and the problems of attaining universal harmony, are all put into a perspective under these six categories. While examining the state of affairs the author also suggests a way for the pursuit of happiness through unselfish transcendence.

 

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