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Ananda Wood

Nationality: Indian

Gender: male

Date Of Brith: 15/08/1947

Present Position: Independent Student

Academic & Professional Qualifications:

Bachelor B.A. in Mathematics and Physics Cambridge, U.K. 1969
Master M.A. in Mathematics and Physics Cambridge, U.K. 1971
Ph.D Anthropology: Modemization of traditional education Chicago, USA 1981
Others      

 

About the Author

Ananda Wood, as his name suggests, is one of those people with a rather mixed background. He was born and brought up in India, studied mathematics at King’s College, Cambridge, and went on to a Doctorate in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. After completing his university education, he returned to India, where he has now settled down to concentrate on a long-standing interest, in the modern interpretation of Advaita philosophy. He is currently a moderator on the Advaitin e-group at yahoo.com. And most of his books and articles may be accessed at: http://www.advaitin.net/Ananda/

Details of Books/Monographs

1 Knowledge before Printing and After Oxford University 1985
2 From the Upanishads (3rd edition) Zen Publications 2009
3 Interpreting the Upanishads (3rd edition) Zen Publications 2009
4 Ways to truth - A view of Hindu Tradition D.K. Printworld 2008

 

Details of Articles

1. Nature & Life - old Ideas, New Questioning, in Prakriti - The Integral Vision Vol. 5: Man in Nature, Editors Kapila Vatsyayan and Baidyanath Saraswati, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi 1995.
2. Objective Pictures & Impersonal Knowledge, published in God of Religions - God of Philosophers: An Indian-Western Conversation, Studies in World Christianity, Vol. 4, Part 2, Edinburgh University Press 1998.
3. Educating Sciences of Life and Mind, in Indian Knowledge Systems, Vol. 1, Editors Kapil Kapoor and Avadesh Kumar Singh, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla 2005.
4. New Physics and Old Sciences, Traditional Knowledge Systems of India and Sri Lanka - COMPAS series on Worldviews and Sciences 5, September 2006.
5. Where Thought Truns Back . . . A Skeptical Approach to Truth, in East and West: Exploring Cultural Manifestations, Somaiya Publications Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai 2010.

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Ways to Truth: A View of Hindu Tradition
Rs.550.00

In India, there has long been a tendency to emphasize the spoken word which is passed on alive from an individual teacher to each individual student. But, through the development of modern media, more use is now made of the written word which records information externally, in institutions that have been industrially, socially and culturally organized.

How then can we understand the Hindu tradition as alive today with its ancient emphasis upon the spoken word and the living individual? That is the question which this book investigates. Accordingly, it asks for a broader understanding of history, which would allow for a rightful accounting of the Vedas and of other oral learning.

Through its continued emphasis upon the living word, the Hindu tradition asks for a deeper understanding of reasoned enquiry. Such reasons do not work primarily through mechanical instruments in the restricted way that modern physics does. Instead, it works essentially through a reflective investigation of our living faculties, which are thus cultivated and clarified.

The goal of truth is not here sought through an institutional consensus; but rather as a common ground, which is approached quite differently through different personalities and institutions of culture.

...
Ways to Truth: A View of Hindu Tradition
Rs.320.00

In India, there has long been a tendency to emphasize the spoken word which is passed on alive from an individual teacher to each individual student. But, through the development of modern media, more use is now made of the written word which records information externally, in institutions that have been industrially, socially and culturally organized.

How then can we understand the Hindu tradition as alive today with its ancient emphasis upon the spoken word and the living individual? That is the question which this book investigates. Accordingly, it asks for a broader understanding of history, which would allow for a rightful accounting of the Vedas and of other oral learning.

Through its continued emphasis upon the living word, the Hindu tradition asks for a deeper understanding of reasoned enquiry. Such reasons do not work primarily through mechanical instruments in the restricted way that modern physics does. Instead, it works essentially through a reflective investigation of our living faculties, which are thus cultivated and clarified.

The goal of truth is not here sought through an institutional consensus; but rather as a common ground, which is approached quite differently through different personalities and institutions of culture.

...